Shrink-e-dinks….nostalgia from the 80’s

This past December I decided to take my work and create pins and earrings.  The question was how to do this.  I found something from my childhood that I always loved to create with, Shrink-e-dinks.  Yes, those plastic sheets you could paint, color or draw on, cut out and then pop in the oven to watch them shrink into a hard plastic.

I remember creating Disney Christmas ornaments from kits that my parents would get for my sister and I.  Those snowy Saturday afternoons where mom and dad needed to keep Karen and I busy….Boy, those were the days.

Well, I found the Shrink-e-dink material and decided, WHY NOT!

First off, I started actually drawing out images and then coloring them in.  This took a long time for each image but once shrunk down they looked really cool.  I used a variety of media including colored pencils, alcohol markers, and inks.

I then did a little more exploring on the art supply websites and found Shrink-e-dink material that you can send through an ink jet printer.  Hallelujah!!!!  This was so much easier. So, I started to look through my sketchbook and computer and found lots of images that I created to print out.  The results were great and the items were and are some of my most popular sellers.

Take a look for yourself here as I have some items still for sale.  Just contact me via messenger in Facebook or you can email at banasiakart@yahoo.com.

Next up, a review of the Epcot® International Festival of the Arts:  Disney has art classes and workshops? Who new they were so artist friendly?  Stay tuned.

Third show for 2016

As I get ready for major events at work and in my life, I have realized that the last four months have been hectic and very busy for me. Not only have I been preparing for this years member’s night at the museum, I’ve also been doing a lot of cleaning at my home and studio in preparation for something big in my life. But enough of that.  There have been plenty of good things happening since January 1st.

First, I was part of Lewis University’s President’s Show. Then, the Artist at the field had a mini-show at the Field Museum’s Harris Education Center. Now, I have three pieces in this year’s third show at Ryerson Woods.  I have never showed there before so this is a first for me. The World of Birds is the title of the show which is artwork of the Great Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators.

As I drove up north, way up north, I realized it was in a setting like Mayskake.  This one building set in the center of a county forest reserve surrounded by nature and beauty.  The drive was long but well worth having my artwork in one more show for the year.

Most of the work is by local Illinois artists. “Birds” is the theme so every painting and illustration shows the gracefulness of sea birds, migratory species, and birds of prey, as well as, the stunning beauty of native Illinois species.

The show will be up until June 6th and is located at Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods, 21850 N. Riverwoods, Riverwoods, IL 60015.

Hours of center: Monday-Thursday, 9am-3pm; Sunday, 1-3pm.

This is the first year I have been in three shows (and counting). Hopefully, 2017 will be just as good to me.

Snowy owl, 2014, Dewent colored drawing pencils on Mi-tients paper, 19x25. Copyright Rebe Banasiak, The Brush Hilt and Banasiak Art Gallery.

Snowy owl, 2014, Dewent colored drawing pencils on Mi-tients paper, 19×25. Copyright Rebe Banasiak, The Brush Hilt and Banasiak Art Gallery.

Ink is for the birds…

Today I am going to focus my post on ink painting, specifically, ink painting with acrylic inks and ink pens.

I have fallen in love with my acrylic inks and ink paint pens. They are amazing and so versatile.  The wolf portrait I have been working on now for over a year (due to lack of some time in the studio) is being painted all in ink.  I started with Derwents inktense pencils as the base coat and then went on to Daler Rowney F&W acrylic inks.  I am also using Molotow and Montana ink markers.  Can I tell you that if you have never used or only used once or twice inks and didn’t like them, you are using the wrong inks. All of these brands (and not to sound like a commercial) work like either watercolors (depends on the amount of water added) or liquid acrylics.  I started using them on watercolor paper but soon found out the using boards is so much better with the inks.  I am going to highlight a step by step from my holiday in Florida for how I use the inks now.

So, first things first, I always draw my picture out.  I chose the majestic crowned crane.

Drawing of the crowned crane with palette, ink and pen set up.

Drawing of the crowned crane with palette, ink and pen set up.

I actually drew this out as a sample for my teen students when I was teaching them how to use inks.  I figured I would finish it at some later date.  I realized that since my holiday was about relaxing and rejuvenating, I would be able to get some sketching and painting in.  The resort I was at had tons of animals and guess what majestic bird.  Yep, that’s right….The crowned Crane!  So I was able to use the bird in the flesh to continue and finish my painting.  Most of the first base coat I did in class for the students.  When I got to the resort, however, I went into full-fledged painter mode.  My studio went from being in my home and the museum to the Animal Kingdom Lodge Resort down at Walt Disney World.  My balcony became my zen zone with all the animals outside my window.  It may have been hot and humid but I stayed outside to finish this little guy using the live bird as my color guide.

My travel studio at my resort on holiday.

My travel studio at my resort on holiday.

Nyala antelope outside my balcony.

Nyala antelope outside my balcony.

View from my balcony.

View from my balcony.

First base coat, done before I got there.  Second base coat, started and done.  Since these are base coats I just watered my brush down and used the ink thin like watercolor.  Next, I started to add less water so that more bold color would start to stand out on the painting.  Shadows, highlights, anywhere I want overlapping color to come through is next.  Usually with watercolor, for shadows I water down slightly but for the inks I went back to watering down like the first base coat.  Inks are very opaque so using this method to add the shadows works perfectly.

Since I was outside painting, it did not take long to wait for the inks to dry.  Surprisingly, inks dry at around the same rate or faster than watercolors.

After all the base coats, shadow and highlight layers, I started adding detail.  Now, the fact that I was painting the colors from the live bird meant that I would have to be patient.  The bird is moving around, at a far distance so I would sometimes have to look through my camera lens to see the detail on the bird.  I started adding little by little strokes from both my brush and directly from the markers.  After overlapping many layers I finally finished.  The result is a colorful portrait of the crowned crane in all its majestic and radiant glory.

Finished painting. Crowned crane, 6x6", inks on aquaboard. Resource from my own photos and from life painting.

Finished painting. Crowned crane, 6×6″, inks on aquaboard. Resource from my own photos and from life painting.

I hope you enjoyed seeing my how I use inks as much as I love painting with them.  See you all really soon!

Rebe

#5dayartchallenge Day 4

I was nominated to do the #5dayartchallenge by one of my besties, Frank. So, for the next five days I will be posting three pieces of art I have done over the past 20 years here, on Instagram and on my Facebook page. Hope you all enjoy the next five days.

#5dayartchallenge Day 4

So, I am on the next five years from 2006-2010.  Let’s see what I can find to show you now.  😉

Tiger

Tiger, 2006, ink on paper.

Pansy III, 2008, Inktense and watercolor on aquaboard.

Pansy III, 2008, Inktense and watercolor on aquaboard.

The Year of the Dragon (Kimodo dragon), 2008, watercolor on paper.

The Year of the Dragon (Kimodo dragon), 2008, watercolor on paper.

 

JUST A REMINDER: All work is copyright to Rebe Banasiak and The Brush Hilt and only a written permission statement by the artist (Rebe Banasiak, that’s me) is acceptable for any and all image use from this website.  Legal action will be taken if use of any images from this website are used without the proper written consent from the artist (yet me again).

#5dayartchallenge Day 3

I was nominated to do the #5dayartchallenge by one of my besties, Frank. So, for the next five days I will be posting three pieces of art I have done over the past 20 years here, on Instagram and on my Facebook page. Hope you all enjoy the next five days.

#5dayartchallenge Day 3

Now, for the time after I got out of school and needing to get my ass in gear.  This next batch is from my first 5 years after graduation from SAIC.  Hope my skills are getting better as time goes on, LOL.

Clouded Leopard, 2002, pastel on paper.

Clouded Leopard, 2002, pastel on paper.

Tiger, 2004, watercolor on paper.

Tiger, 2004, watercolor on paper.

Hyacinth Macaw, 2005, pastel on paper.

Hyacinth Macaw, 2005, pastel on paper.

JUST A REMINDER: All work is copyright to Rebe Banasiak and The Brush Hilt and only a written permission statement by the artist (Rebe Banasiak, that’s me) is acceptable for any and all image use from this website.  Legal action will be taken if use of any images from this website are used without the proper written consent from the artist (yet me again).

Who, who….. the snowy owl that’s who!

It’s been awhile since I posted so here is a little something about the latest piece I have recently finished.

Just a little background about why some things take me longer to finish than others.

When I am busy at my regular job and also in life, I tend to start new drawings, illustrations, paintings, or other fine art pieces and then decide to slowly walk away and let the idea of leaving them fester inside me until I give myself a non-committal deadline, if that is what you can call it.  I also have a problem with staying on task, which is me self-diagnosing myself with ADHD and using it as an excuse.  I jump from one started project to the next and back to another and the cycle goes on and on and on, until I start to pull my slowly whitening hair out.  You get the picture.  Sooner or later, everything does get done……eventually.

So this brings me to explain the “Who” in my blog title this month.  I started an illustration of the snowy owl mount in the bird exhibit hall at the Field Museum about a year ago.  I drew the outline one Saturday and then put it back in my portfolio and decided to draw something else.

Outline of the Snowy owl illustration.

Well, last September I decided to start adding color.  Every Saturday that I met with my one art group called Artist at the field, I worked on this owl.  I decided that I wanted to use colored pencils.  They are one of those media that I am so comfortable with that I can basically use them in my sleep, plus the fact I have not created anything in colored pencil in a long time, I mean a very long time.  Since the snowy owl doesn’t have too much coloration I opted to use my Derwent drawing pencils.  There are AWESOME!  24 colors in the range and they are dull and muted colors perfect for the owl.  I LOVE THEM!  They are wonderful because they erase with ease just like a graphite pencil.  I figured, why not, so slowly I added color.

Color on the face.

Color on the face.

The face was first.  A little white here, a little brown there, a little blue here.  The muted colors actually worked well on the dark colored paper I picked. I added color as highlights, I added other colors as shadows, but the best part was using the pencils to create the pattern on the wings and back.

Ventral plumage and start of the wings.

Ventral plumage and start of the wings.

Wing and the feather pattern.

Wing and the feather pattern.

The trick is you do not draw out each and every feather. The technique I use is placing color as highlights or shadows where you see it to give the illusion that there are feathers. I also make sure I use pencils that are really sharp.  The tip being sharp is very essential to getting the little feathered texture on the wings and underbelly.

After I had the owl finished, I started on the rodent in the owl’s talons.  The poor little guy never had a chance.  Oh well.  Finishing the rodent was pretty easy, one, it was a small area of the paper, and two, it was nice to actually put strokes of hair on the paper. Once the rodent was finished I started the snow and rock.

Rodent finished and starting the rock.

Rodent finished and starting the rock.

The foreshortening and slant of the rock seemed very odd when I drew it at first.  Once I started to color it in I noticed that I needed to either add more bumps and pot marks or take away where there were too much texture.  All in all, I think I was pretty successful in creating a realistic rock.

Rock and snow.

Rock and snow.

With that last stroke I was able to put down my pencils and breath a sigh of relief.  I had finished one more piece.  I was so excited that when my group colleagues came to get me for lunch they saw me jumping around for joy.  Yay, I got a little excited.  I love that feeling of satisfaction when I finish a piece.  What was also nice was when I placed the finished piece in front of the exhibit mount I was drawing, every person passing by stopped to say how beautiful it was.  And here is the finished Snowy Owl.

Snowy owl, 2014, Dewent colored drawing pencils on Mi-tients paper, 19x25.  Copyright Banasiak Art Gallery and Rebe Banasiak.

Snowy owl, 2014, Dewent colored drawing pencils on Mi-tients paper, 19×25. Copyright Banasiak Art Gallery and Rebe Banasiak.

Snowy owl with mount in exhibit case.

Snowy owl with mount in exhibit case.